A simple way to stop someone from using your Wi-Fi (mainly for Binatone Routers)

I checked some of my blog’s traffic stats recently and discovered that a lot of the people coming here were searching for a way to block someone from using their wireless connection. Now, I understand that a rudimentary way of doing so is changing the password, but this will not always work, especially if the people involved have easy access to your password.

Now, with this post, I will show you a simple way to block access to your wireless connection without having to change your password. This method is very basic; it will certainly not stop the most determined attacker, but it works when the people you want to block are say, family members. Here’s how to do it:

  1. You will have to block every device individually, so for starters, you will need the MAC addresses of the devices you want to block. If you don’t know what a MAC Address is, go here. You’ll find the MAC Address of a device somewhere in its network settings. If you still cannot find it, just go to Google and put in something like “how to find the MAC address <your_device’s_platform>. You will need physical access to the device you need to block. There is another way to block devices when you don’t have physical access to them; I will discuss that at the end of this post.
  2. Open your router’s configuration page (should be something like 192.168.1.1). Key in the username (usually admin/administrator) and password (the default password is generally password; you may also try leaving it blank. Once you are in, change your default log-in details.
  3. Once you are inside your router’s configuration page, go to the interface setup portion. For Binatone routers, it’s usually just a tab that says “Interface Setup”. For other routers, it’s usually somewhere near where your wireless connection’s password settings are.
  4. Go to the wireless connection settings (for Binatone) and for other routers, search for a similar sub-category or option.
  5. Search for the wireless/MAC Address filter. This is where you will do the actual blocking. Make sure you have the right MAC Address and put it in one of the text fields which will usually say 00:00:00:00:00:00. Once you have done this, select the required action, in this case, Deny Association. Now, click on the “Activate(d)” radio button and save your preferences.

That’s it. You can put in whatever MAC Address you want to block and save (remember to activate the filter and choose the correct action setting). Note that this won’t really stop a very determined attacker or someone who has a physical link with your router

If you do not have physical access to the devices you want to block, there is another way to go about this. This is by changing the action setting under the MAC Address filter. Change it from “Deny Association” to “Allow Association”, and instead of keying in the MAC Address(es) you want to block, key in the MAC Address(es) you don’t want to block. What this will (obviously) do is only allow certain devices access and block everyone else out. This is useful if you want to add an extra (but still basic) layer of security or don’t have physical access to the devices you need to keep out.

Warning: Take care while changing your router settings and only do so when you are completely confident and sure of what you are doing. If you block yourself out by mistake, you can always use a device with a physical link to your router (i.e. ethernet/USB connection with it [not wireless]) and access the router’s page, enabling you to remove the erratic settings.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. 🙂

Advertisements

6 Comments

  1. I have the Binatone WR1500N3 router. The Mac Address Filtering option does not provide for ‘allow association’ but only ‘deny association’.

    Reply

    1. try using LAN wire, if you do not change password and not activated the MAC address filter otherwise just take pin and there is small hole in router which reset the router. You can try either way. Hope this will help you.

      Reply

Share your opinion on this!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s